Browsing articles by " Yang Kwak"

Chosun Sebup

This study was to examine the basis of ‘Cho-sun-se-bub, which was   one of the oldest martial arts with Bon-kuk-kum-bub’ in history. ‘Cho-sun-se-bub’ was widely disclosed in the beginning of 17th century through ‘Mu-bee-ji’ which was a book of compiled tactics of China, and was considered to influence in Japan as well as in China.

First of all, the study outlined the culture of Korean sword and compared books of tactics of both Korea and China and ‘Mu-bee-Ji’. And then, the relation to and historical background of ‘Cho-sun-se-bub’ was investigated through looking martial arts before ‘Cho-sun-se-bub’ such as swordmanship or ‘Keok-bong,’ etc., and practical technique of ‘Cho-sun-se-bub’ was revived according to the principle.

The result of the study indicated that ‘Cho-sun-se-bub’ influenced to swordmanship of oriental three countries, and became a basis of international exchange, which was very rare at that time. It is an epoch-making fact in the history of martial arts. In addition, based on the practical technique of ‘Cho-sun-se-bub.’ Korean Kumdo can obtain a prestigious status in the world of international Kumdo. Also ‘Cho-sun-se-bub’ will be a significant basis in the history of Korean Kumdo.

조선세법 ( Chosun-Sebup)

By John Karns (NJ Sung Moo Kwan)

Chapter 1. ( Cheon) – Heaven

1. 거정세 ( Guh-jeong-se)

Making high stance as if one lifts a big pot.

  • Draw down, stepping forward with the left foot.  Slice up and straight, and at the top reverse the sword to cut down straight while stepping forward with the right foot.  Finish the cut at belly height, then flick while stepping back with the right foot (Twee-bo-goon-lan).  Grip case, turn over and sheathe.

2.  과좌세 ( Gua-jua-se)

Cutting from upleft to downright

  • Reverse the sword so sharp edge is up.  Draw up and guard head from front attack while stepping with your left foot slightly to the left.  Turn to the left attacker and cut down right to left.  Turn right 90 degrees to the original front while bringing sword up over left shoulder and cut down and right, then bring over right shoulder and cut right to left (continuously).  Step with the opposite foot on each cut.  Reverse grip and sheathe.

3. 과우세 (Gua-woo-se)

Cutting from upright to downright

  • Step forward with right foot in front of left, and turning to the right while drawing down.  Cut up and right with the draw, circle around the head and cut top left to down right.  Flip sword horizontally to original rear and while stepping back to the original front cut horizontally – 220 degree cut.  Reverse grip and sheathe.

4. 탄복세 ( Tan-bok-se)

Thrusting the belly

  1. Turn sword over and draw sharp side up, flip over and step forward with LEFT foot and sword at center.  Step forward with right foot while thrusting belly deeply screwing the blade facing right.  Step forward with left foot while bringing sword over left shoulder, then cutting down to knee height from top left to bottom right.  Step back right foot and flick (Twee-Shin), and follow with the left foot (slide back).

Chapter 2. ( Jeeh) – Earth

1. 표두세 ( Pyo-doo-se)

Cutting the leopard’s head – Straight up to down cut

  • Step forward with the right foot while drawing down, and bring the sword up to the right shoulder next to the jaw, blade pointing back over right shoulder.  Step forward with the left foot while cutting a center straight cut.  Bring right foot parallel with the left while thrusting upwards above enemy’s solar plexus.  Slowly bring down to center and then step back with left foot and flick.  Sheathe.

2. 좌협세 (Jua-hyeop-se)

Thrusting left chest

  • Turn sword for draw and step forward with left foot while drawing.  Draw sword to left hip and sharp edge out.  While stepping forward with the right foot thrust the sword to enemy’s left chest (sword is horizontal not vertical).  Bring sword up on the right side of the head to guard while stepping forward with the left foot, bring sword around the head and cut top left to down right.  Step back with right foot, follow left slightly and flick.  Sheathe.

3. 우협세 (Woo-hyeop-se)

Thrusting right chest

  • Turn sword for draw and step forward with the right foot, draw the sword horizontal to the right hip with sharp facing out.  Step forward with the left foot and thrust sword into right chest of the enemy.  Follow slightly with right foot and bring sword up to Guh-jeong (high stance).  Slowly bring down to center (Joong-sa-pyoung) while stepping back with left foot.  Grip case and sheathe.

4. 어거세 (Uh-guh-se)

Sword at center position – pushing forward

  • Turn sword for draw and step forward with right foot.  Step forward with left foot and push the right side of enemy’s blade.  Step left and back with left foot (about 45 degrees), bring sword down slightly then up (slide blocking) for a straight cut to knee height.  Step to the right with right foot following with left and flick.  Sheathe.

Chapter 3. (In) – Human

1. 은망세 (Uhn-mahng-se)

Silver Python

  1. Step forward with right foot and draw and cut horizontally at chest height.  Step forward with left foot and cut straight high to low.  Pivot on feet and step forward with right foot and cut straight high to low.  Pivot on feet to the LEFT side, leading with sword high over head to guard.  Bring feet together and then while stepping with left foot out to the side bring sword around head and cut down top right to bottom left.  Pivot on feet to OPPOSITE side leading with sword at high guard.  Bring feet together and while stepping out with the right foot bring sword around head and cut from top left to bottom right.  Step back with left foot to original front and follow with right foot to Jung-sa-pyoung.  Sheathe.

2. 전시세 (Jeon –shi-se)

As if one spreads wings

  1. Draw low left to high right while stepping with left foot.  Step forward with right foot while circling sword for another cut at the same angle as the draw.  Slide back foot forward and bring sword to Guh-jeong.  Slowly drop to Jun-Dan, and then step back with left foot and flick.  Sheathe.

3. 요격세 (Yo-gyeok-se)

Cutting from upright to down left

  1. Draw low left to high right while stepping with left foot then step forward with right foot while circling sword clockwise around head and cutting top left to bottom right.  Step forward with left foot and thrust with sword blade facing right to the throat.  Step back with left foot and bring sword to Jung-sa-pyung and sheathe.

4. 봉두세 (Bong-doo-se)

Beheading Phoenix’s head

  1. Turn sharp up and draw, sliding left foot slightly and stepping forward with left as soon as sword is out, pushing left side of enemy’s blade.  Step forward with right foot off to right side (about 45 degrees), cut straight down to knee height.  Step forward left foot even with right, bring sword down and left and cut left knee to right shoulder- no higher.  Slowly come to Jung-sa-pyoung and step back left foot for flick.  Sheathe.

By Rhee, Jong Rim

Bonkuk Kumbup

BonKuk Kumbup Script

Ji-Kum-Dae-Juhk

(지검대적세)
Hold the Sword, Face the Thief

Both hands grasp the hilt. Stand erect with the sword at the left shoulder.
Woo-Nae-Ryak

(우내략)

Nae-Ryak
-Turn to the right. The right foot turns, brushing past on the inside.
Jin-Juhn-Kyuk-Juhk

(진전격적)
Jin-Juhn-Kyuk-Juhk
Advance forward to attack the thief

Using the right hand and right leg, strike forward.
Geum-Gae-Dok-Lib

(금계독립)
Geum-Gae-Dok-Lib
Golden Rooster Stands on one Leg

Lift the sword and the left leg. Turn to the left leg. Turn to the left and face to the rear.
Hoo-Il-Kyuk

(후일격)
Hoo-Il-Kyuk
Rear single strike

Turning to the left, using the right hand and the right leg, strike once.
Geum-Gae-Dok-Lib

(금계독립)
Geum-Gae-Dok-Lib
Golden Rooster Stands on one leg

Turn to the left, raise the sword and left leg, turn and look forward.
Jin-Juhn-Sal-Juhk

(진전살적)
Advance forward to attack the thief.

Using the right hand and right leg, strike forward.
Il-Ja

(일자)
Immediately coil left and right. Using the left hand and left leg, thrust once.
Meng-Ho-Eun-Lim

(맹호은림)
Meng-Ho-Eun-Lim
Wild tiger hides in the forest

Turn twice to the right & turn left once
Ahn-Ja

(안자)
Ahn-Ja
Jik boo sends the scroll

Turning (from the right) and using the right hand and left leg, thrust once to the left side.
Jik-Boo-Song-Suh

(직부송서)
Jik-Boo-Song-Suh
Jik boo sends the scroll

Turning (from the right) and using the right hand and left leg, thrust once to the left side.
Bal-Cho-Shim-Sa

(발초심사)
Bal-Cho-Shim-Sa
Part the grass, search for the snake

Turning to the left, face forward. Using the right hand and right foot, hit once. With one foot advance, taking a jumping step.
Pyo-Do-Aap-Jung

(표두압정)
Pyo-Do-Aap-Jung
Press the leopard's forehead

Coil left and right. Using the right hand and right foot, thrust forward once.
Jo-Chun

(조천)
Jo-Chun
Early sky

From there turn to the right. Turn to the rear and with both hands hold the sword at forehead level. Turning right, turn and advance facing to the rear.
Ja-Hyup-Soo-Doo

(좌협수두)
Ja-Hyup-Soo-Doo
Face right, block the thief

Lift the left leg and brush by to the outside.
Hyang-Woo-Bang-Juhk

(향우방적)
Hyang-Woo-Bang-Juhk
Rear single attack

Using the right hand from the right leg, strike once.
Hoo-Il-Kyuk

(후일격)
Rear single strike

Turning to the left, using the right hand and the right leg, strike once.
Juhn-Gi-Sae

(전기세)
Juhn-Gi
Advance forward, Kill the thief

Using the right hand and right leg, strike once.
Jin-Juhn-Sal-Juhk

(진전살적)
Advance forward to attack the thief

Using the right hand and right leg, strike forward.
Geum-Gae-Dok-Lib

(금계독립)
Golden Rooster Stands on one Leg

Lift the sword and the left leg. Turn to the left leg. Turn to the left and face to the rear
Ja-Yo-Kyuk

(좌요격)
Ja-Yo-Kyuk
Left waist attack

Lift leg and with the sword on the left side, wash the left side of the neck
Woo-Yo-Kyuk

(우요격)
Woo-Yo-Kyuk
Right waist attack.

Immediately turn to the right and lift the right leg, and with the sword on the right side, wash the right side of the neck.
Hoo-Il-Ja

(후일자)
Hoo-Il-Ja
Rear single thrust

Using the right hand and left foot, thrust once.
Jang-Kyo-Boon-Soo

(장교분수)
Jang-Kyo-Boon-Soo
Long dragon spouts water

Turn to the left, face forward and strike once using the right hand and right foot.
Baek-Won-Chool-Dong

(백원출동)
Baek-Won-Chool-Dong
White ape departs the cave

Raise the right hand and right foot.
Woo-Chan-Kyuk

(우찬격)
Woo-Chan-Kyuk
Right needle attack

Twist the right hand, step with the right leg, and thrust hard to the right.
Yong-Yak-Il-Ja

(용약일자)
Yong-Yak-Il-Ja1
Bravely skip, single thrust

Turning to the right, with the right hand and left leg, thrust once.
Hoo-Il-Kyuk

(후일격)
Hoo-Il-Kyuk
Rear single strike

Turning to the left, using the right hand and the right leg, strike once.
Hoo-Il-Ja

(후일자)
Hoo-Il-Ja
Rear single thrust

Using the right hand and left foot, thrust once.
Hyang-Woo-Bang-Juhk

(향우방적)
Hyang-Woo-Bang-Juhk
Rear single attack

Using the right hand from the right leg, strike once.
Hyang-Juhn-Sal-Juhk

(향전살적)
Face Front and Kill the Thief

Using the right hand and right leg, strike twice to the front.
Hyang-Juhn-Sal-Juhk

(향전살적)
Face Front and Kill the Thief

Using the right hand and right leg, strike twice to the front.
Shi-Woo-Sang-Juhn

(시우상전)

Shi-Woo-Sang-Juhn
Rhinoceros and ox face-off in battle

Using the right and left leg, thrust once and finish.

What is Siljun Dobup?

 

*Why should one study the Sword (Siljin Dobup) in the modern age of  Firearms?

Written by  Jin K. Seong

The question gets commonly asked: Why should we study sword training in the modern age of guns? What is the purpose of sword training? Exercise? If so, one could do other other sports , such as running, or weightlifting. Perhaps the reasons lies in the spiritual aspects of sword training.

The purpose of the sword arouses concerns since the sword is capable of  threatening  one’s life and thus arouses mixed feelings of nervousness, fear, bravery and desperation as he or she encounters in  a life or death situation. In sword training (Siljin Doup) one trains by imagining oneself in such a situation and experiences the emotions that one would encounter under these extreme circumstances.

Life or death is a simple and basic concept. One becomes desperate to survive when he faces death. Wealth, honor, social class or occupation does not matter when someone is about to die. Life and death mark the beginning and the end and when in a situation of facing death one empties and lets go of concerns. Through the art of the sword one hypothetically situates oneself to be in an extreme situation where his life is threatened and tries to release all  concerns.

Interestingly, our brains do not distinguish between what we see and what we think. The practioneer imagines himself in a life or death situation perhaps in a different historical time period, depending on the quality of his practice, his imagination could produce the same effect as facing this type of situation.

Running and weightlifting are solely physical activities that do not deal with the spiritual aspects of dealing with life and death. In the practice of Swords the spiritual aspect  is achieved by training with the concept of  life and death.

Through the practice of Sword ( Siljin Dobup), one trains himself to control his own emotions and seek mental freedom.

 

* Master of mind and body

Written by  Jin K. Seong

Most everyone who takes up kumdo for the first time will talk about his or her body not listening to his or her head.  This is probably because the body is unfamiliar with the new stances and movements which require the use of muscles not often used.  So when teaching, I say, “That happens because you are not the master of your body.”  To this, the students reply, “Obviously I am the master of my body, but if I am truly the master, how come my body is not listening to me?” To this, I answer, “That is why we train: so that our bodies will listen to our minds and move the way we want them to.”

The mind wishes the body to move a certain way, but the body doesn’t listen.  But through continuous training, the body starts to obey the mind, and the gap between the mind and body begins to narrow.   Thus as time passes, we begin to think that we are truly the master of our bodies.  But strange enough, once we think that we are truly the master of our bodies, we realize that the mind is what we really want to control but cannot.  We realize we lose our sense of balance, we are easily surprised or afraid, we hesitate, we question and so on.

So we feel the need to control the mind, that is, how we think.  And not surprisingly, all the training and practice that took place to bring the body under control comes in very handy as the same logic can be applied when trying to control the mind.  People sometimes deceive us, but our bodies never lie: when we are hit, we hurt; when we do not eat, we are hungry; when we sweat, we feel refreshed afterwards.  Thus, training our bodies is a straight forward process.  But training of the mind could be slightly trickier.  This is why training of the body precedes training of the mind.  The former serves as a practice run for the latter.  And we have to believe that the training of the mind is possible, because it will never happen if we don’t first believe.

So what does it mean to be able to train our bodies to listen to our minds and eventually train our minds to go where we want it to?  This means one becomes the true master of one’s mind and body.  Being the master of one’s mind will mean not losing one’s balance (or being able to quickly find it again after it has been lost), overcoming one’s fears, being more bold and decisive and so forth.  If one is able to control one’s thoughts, one will be able purge the negative and unnecessary and replace them with the positive and productive.

Only when we can truly control our thoughts like we control our bodies, can we truly become the masters of our destiny.  We will be happy not because there is something to be happy about but rather because we have made a conscious decision to be happy.  We will be happy simply because we chose to be.

 

The ultimate goal of Siljin Dobup

Written by  Jin K. Seong.

The ultimate goal of Siljin Dobup is ‘controlling the mind”. The human being consists of mind and body. We think our body and mind are ours or are they? We often make mistakes, regret, collapse and abandon when we fail to control our body and mind. Can we control our mind then? Can we really become the master of our mind? Through training in Siljin Dobup we seek the answer. Siljin Dobup is designed to achieve the ultimate state were the body and mind become One.

 

There are five ascending stages of training in Siljin Dobup Jee (earth), Soo (water), Pung (wind), Hwa (fire), Cheon (sky). There are also some basic cutting moves to study before Jee, however major training begins at the level of Jee.

The details of each stage’s goal and mind study will be explained below.

 

1.Set Jee-Earth  Putting down “the self”

Jee is Earth. Earth is the origin of life and death. Since the Earth is the fundamental in all lives, it is the first stage of learning. Learning is accepting. We need to empty what we have already to accept new things. It means to be humble enough to accept the teacher from whom you’re eager to learn.

 

SOO-PA-RHEE- this terminology stands for the three stages of martial arts training originated from Buddhist terminology

SOO- Keeping what we’re taught. It is a stage that we keep the principles and basics learned from the teacher.

PA- Is the stage that one breaks the mold by one’s individuality and ability to create a unique style based on keeping the principles and basics. This stage is planned intentional and conscious.

RHEE- Is the stage of natural and unconscious training which is the extension of stage PA. This is the ultimate stage that the trainee performs PA freely without losing reason, rules and basics.

 

It is impossible to access learning without studying the stage of SOO. A trainee can fall into conceit easily and too much pride will lead to the failure of communication with others. That is why the trainee needs a guide in the beginning stage.  A strong relationship has to be built between the teacher and disciple at the stage of SOO. The disciple must have faith in the teacher’s way even though he or she disagrees with his ideology. It is a matter of sincerity not of right or wrong. Again, without emptying what you already have and being humble, the journey of learning could go wrong.

 

1. Chapter (Set) Jee is designed as the training stage of  Soo. A trainee will learn to keep the basics and principles of the sword technically and mentally in the frame of the teacher’s philosophy. It is a very straight forward chapter that every student must follow.

 

2. Set Soo– Flowing like water

SOO means water. Our mind should flow like water. Water can harmonize in any place and transform into any shape without losing its character. Our mind should be flexible like water. We should open our minds to the unlimited possibility for greater achievement. The movement of SOO should be big and smooth with flexibility as water.

 

3.Set Poong— Stopping like Wind

The wind blows or stops without being seen. We practice severing and stopping in Poong. Our minds are limitless and free of charge.  Sometimes our minds are stuck on a memory of the past or fear of the unknown in the future. This is not an efficient way of controlling our minds. If this happens during sparring or competition, one can not maintain the freedom of moving and find the weakness of the opponent.

In set Poong by abruptly cutting out unnecessary things, we make room for positive energy of Set Hwa.

 

4.Set Hwa—burning like fire

Fire is energy. When a person builds up Chi energy he can have more power, passion, confidence and dream bigger dreams.

You will learn how to put down “the self” and accept in Set Jee and Soo. You will learn how to make room in your mind by severing unnecessary things in Set Poong. And finally you will learn how to fill up your positive Chi energy in Set Hwa. The movements of Hwa are live and continuous. You should train to generate spirited Chi energy as if there is a blazing fire inside of you!

 

5.Set Choen– Sky

Cheon is the final chapter to start controlling your mind after competing Set Jee, Soo, Poong and Hwa. Cheon is Sky and it covers everything. It is tolerant of good, bad, beautiful, ugly, hot and cold. The existence of all things is under Sky.

You should be able to recognize and accept that you are the master of you mind. Cheon is different for you and me. There is my Cheon and your Cheon. Everything is free and in harmony.

 

 

What is Siljun Dobup?

Siljun Dobup is the practice of using the sword correctly. As opposed to the showy modern forms that are nothing more than entertainment, Sil Jun Do Bup aims to strike a balance between theory and practice.

Every martial art has an original form. Form is very important and it must be real. To be realistic, real combat experience is necessary. Through practice, that experience is proven and preserved. I have been practicing Kendo for over 30 years, always with the mentality that I am fighting real opponents. Sil Jun Do Bup is based on real combat, and many unnecessary movements have been removed. With the right mentality, anyone can enjoy practicing this martial art.

Siljun Dobup teaches etiquette, tradition, breathing, drawing, sheathing, basic cutting and, in order of progression, Jee, Soo, Poong, Hwa, Chun forms aim to create healthy minds and bodies.

Why Practice Sword?

Some ask, “Why practice using a sword in an age of guns.” This is no different from asking someone why he or she jogs when we have cars. Also, some consider a martial art that requires a weapon to be impractical. Then, on the other hand, how should one react when the opponent wields a weapon? Is it possible to fight multiple enemies like our action heroes do? These questions only consider martial arts as a form of combat. It is true that the sword was used to wound and kill in the past. However, people practice martial arts today to further develop their mind and body. Only the sword is capable of such duality, and it is our ultimate goal to wield its power through a well trained mind.

What are the benefits to practice sword?

The purpose of Kendo, as mentioned above, is to train the mind and body, but what other purpose does it serve in modern society? How can we benefit from practicing with a real sword?

In the beginning stages, stress relief and focus is most notable. Since a sword is a dangerous weapon, it requires much alertness. The thought that one could get hurt by being careless compels the wielder to focus. As a result, one focuses only on the sword and empties his or her mind

Balance is developed and posture is corrected. Especially in real sword practice, every stance requires one to straighten one’s back, broadening the chest and centering the waist. Purposely lowering one’s center of gravity, the stance naturally corrects posture.

After advancing to mid level, Sat Ji is taught, where we study the proper way to breathe and accumulate our Ki energy(prana); resulting in a healthier body.

Set Soo emphasizes flexibility, rhythm, and the removal of excess force.

The high level Set Poong teaches how to focus one’s strength in a short period of time and the proper way to impact the target. This technique draws out maximum destructibility from a state of accumulated ki.

Set Hwa combines the use of ki, breathing, flexibility, control of strength, and focus mentioned before to bring out one’s maximum potential.

How the attitude and mentality gained from real sword practice will be further explained in Chapter 4.

Who can practice Siljun Dobup?

Real sword practice can be enjoyed by people who are stressed, lacking focus, unfit, have bad posture, are not competitive, have low self esteem without difficulty.

I have been practicing Kendo for around 40 years and have taught countless students. Real sword practice can certainly be a joyful experience in your life. This book is my small gift that I hope will help readers grow.

 

What is Kumdo?

Kumdo FAQ

What is Kumdo?
What are some benefits of practicing Kumdo?
Who Can Practice Kumdo?
Is it possible for non-atheltic people to practice Kumdo?
Will Kumdo make me smarter?
Can anyone participate in tournaments?
What is an officially recognized school?

What is Kumdo?
Kumdo is an ancient form of martial art with its origins in Korea. Kumdo means “The way of the sword” and its ancient form originated in Korea and Japan nearly two thousand years ago as a form of sword fighting used by warriors to defend their territorial hold over the country. Kumdo is therefore founded on a strong sense of patriotism and loyalty to one’s fellow countrymen and family. Also, as a sword symbolized a power over one’s life, Kumdo soon developed into a true martial art and a way of life in the heart as opposed to a brutal method of combat. In the 18th century, Kumdo was reshaped to its present form using bamboo swords and protective gear to make Kumdo safer to practice without compromising any of its focus on spiritual and mental prowess. Although strength and speed play important roles, one cannot master the art of Kumdo without a pure and unadulterated state of mind and heart. It is this aspect of Kumdo which makes it very appealing and beneficial as it intensively trains both mind and body. Kumdo is a very popular martial art with over three million current practitioners all over the world.

What are some benefits of practicing Kumdo?

Respect: Kumdo is not only about the techniques of the sword. It is about the truth of the sword. Therefore, its teachings emphasize improving character and showing respect for others. The first teaching of Kumdo is respect. Then it teaches a philosophy of protecting weaker people. Before and after training, Mook-sang (the meditation time) will help you reconsider yourself, and it will help you to have a good body and soul. The philosophy you learn from Kumdo will give you good life values in this modern society.

Concentration : Kumdo originated from real sword fighting, so this sport is based on real life and death situations. Concentration that will not allow a single mistake will be gradually built through constant training and sparring.

Stress : Kumdo requires Ki-hap (yelling from the abdomen) to have energy exceeding that of the opponent. While yelling out loud is inappropriate in city life, yelling with powerful Ki-hap and hitting a target with a Jook-do (bamboo sword) will relieve all stresses.

Confidence : Kumdo is a sport for everybody. Men, women, old people and young people can train and spar together. An older person beating a youth and a woman beating a man are scenes that can easily be seen in Kumdo. During the process of training with powerful Ki-hap and sweating with young people, you will gain more confidence in your life.

Health : Unlike other sports you can actually feel the fast reinforcement of health in Kumdo. All the techniques of Kumdo start from Dan-jun (the power supply from the abdomen). Training in Kumdo modifies Dan-jun and helps the circulation of energy. In addition this training gives the efficacy of acupressure on the hands and feet. So after training the body gets rid of tiredness and feels lighter.

Spiritual Strength : Kumdo is modified from real sword fighting. Since sword fighting is a life or death situation, Kumdo demands a powerful spiritual effort. “If you keep it you will lose. If you give it up you will win.” This is one of Kumdo’s tenets, meaning the way to get victory over your opponent is giving up all of your strength.

Correct Posture : Kumdo’s basic stance emphasizes the straight back and open chest with stable balance between the right and the left sides of the body. Therefore, Kumdo is very beneficial in correcting ones posture and complimenting the outward presentation of oneself.

Self-Defense : Kumdo minimizes unnecessary movements and optimizes the efficiency of ones speed and power. Therefore, a strike or a counter-strike executed by a black belt expert carries with it overwhelming velocity and force. A common misconception involving Kumdo is that it is useless without a sword. However, Kumdo optimizes the basic concept of applying a great velocity and force to a certain point of attack with correct timing. Even with bare hands an expert Kumdo martial artist can be extremely powerful in combat. Kumdo basic training for striking, blocking and counter striking an opponent improves ones reflexes and muscle responsiveness and quickness. In addition to the effects of physical training, the sense of quiet and unmovable confidence that comes from training in Kumdo will be essential in ones self-defense both physically and mentally.

Who Can Practice Kumdo?
Everyone is eligible. Kumdo is a “lifetime sport” that can be enjoyed by men, women, older and younger people. For young people, it teaches a right attitude and respect, and it improves confidence, endurance and concentration. Unlike some other sports, Kumdo uses a natural-posture. It is a walking-standing posture which uses a straight spine and wide chest. This comfortable position allows older people to enjoy Kumdo without any problems.

Is it possible for non-atheltic people to practice Kumdo?
Kumdo is a sport of body and soul. Obviously, being an athlete and having a strong body are advantages during the beginning course. But when sparring in the advanced course, ability depends more on the spiritual side than the athletic side. Confidence, decision-making, concentration and wisdom are necessary, and fear, panic, fright and confusion are the diseases in Kumdo. Even though you are a non-athlete and weak, you can do really well in Kumdo if you have strong spiritual strength. Once you start Kumdo, you gradually build you physical strength by controlling your own amount of sport. Therefore, having a weak body is not a problem.

Will Kumdo make me smarter?
Kummdo improves ones focus, insight, complex decision making ability and creativity. Many other martial arts favor, either by personal default or by training, one side of the body through man-made postures and stances. Kumdo’s natural stance emphasizes a balance between the right and left sides of the body which results in a more balanced use of both sides of the brain. Therefore, not only is Kumdo training beneficial in ones focus and decision-making ability, but also in ones mental insight and creativity.

Can anyone participate in tournaments?
Every three years there is a world competition held by IKF (International Kendo Federation) and there are many other competitions and tournaments held by Kumdo and Kendo federations and organizations. Anyone can participate at his or her own ability level. Common divisions are: grade school, junior high school, high school, college, youth, men, women, Keup and Dan.

What is an officially recognized school?
Kumdo has a history of approximately 2000 years. During this long history it has continually been studied, improved and re-established both in its philosophy and practice. Kumdo is a martial art that particularly focuses on ones mental and spiritual maturity, inner strength and pure heart. Because of this a Kumdo teacher must be tested and approved periodically by an internationally recognized official governing body consisting of Kumdo experts from all over the world. This governing body using the highest standards which are strictly enforced bestows internationally recognized Dan (black belt rank) and teaching permits. Choosing an officially recognized school with an officially approved instructor is a first and prudent step in learning correct Kumdo.

  • Written by Master Jin K. Seong(Kyosa 7th Dan)

Leadership Course

Kendo Academy Leadership Class

There are those who lead and those who follow. Leaders create their lives. Followers live lives created by someone else.

The Leadership Class is a hands-on class that teaches students the importance of goal setting, leadership skills, public speaking, community service and teaching skills. It is required that students attend the extra leadership class every week in order to benefit from Leadership Class experience. These are highly motivated and well disciplined students.

The leadership program builds confidence in the youngster and turns them into a leadernot only in the school, but in the community

To join the Leadership Team and receive all the benefits it offers you must:

•Be 12 years of age or older
•Be prepared to be a role model for other students
Assist classes and school events 사용 중인 브라우저가 해당 이미지의 표시를 지원하지 않을 수도 있습니다.

C.I.T Course

Kendo Academy Certified Instructor Course
Kendo Academy Certified Instructor Course is for individual who is enthusiastic about Kendo Training. The students will learn the fundamental techniques to be an instructor, and how to run a Kendo School. The goal of Certified Instructor Course is to become a respectful Kendo Master with excellent school managing skill. They will receive advanced individual training to be a proud Kendo Academy Sung Moo Instructor

Private Lesson


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